Crop Selection

Health & Wellness

About Tomato Products Wellness Council (TWPC)


TPWC funds scientific research on tomato products and their link to helping reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Its members are tomato growers, processors and product manufacturers. 
 

 

Tomato Products Health and Wellness Council (TPWC) is an organization of tomato growers, processors and well-known brands working to create awareness of the health benefits of tomato products by providing industry-wide leadership, communications and scientific research.

On the
TPWC site you’ll find information about tomato products, including: nutrition, science, recipes and serving ideas.

 


Make Delicious, Nutritious, Easy and Affordable Meals? Yes, You Can – A closer look the grocery store yields a new appreciation for cost- and nutrition-conscious options


While some health experts traditionally recommend shopping the grocery store perimeter for nutritious options like fresh produce, the center of the store may warrant a closer look, given rising food costs. Many options there not only are nutritious and taste great, they also can be more cost-conscious and have a conveniently longer shelf life. Families can stock up on healthy and affordable staples (especially when on sale) like whole grain rice and pasta and a variety of beans, for example. Tomato products like pasta sauces, canned tomatoes, salsa and tomato paste and juice also are versatile, inexpensive and nutritious staples to keep on hand to make quick, wholesome meals, says the Tomato Products Wellness Council.

In addition to being a vegetable that even the pickiest of eaters like, tomato products are good partners with other healthy foods because they offer great flavor and texture. Right after being picked from the vine at peak ripeness, tomatoes that become shelf-stable products are cooked and sealed in containers. This guarantees their full sun-ripened flavor and safety from salmonella and other food-borne pathogens – plus the heating process provides an enhanced value of lycopene, an antioxidant that helps fight disease. Tomato products also offer important nutrients like vitamins A and C, potassium and fiber. Clinical trials show heart-health and other benefits of consuming tomato products.

To beat the summer heat and rising food costs, TPWC offers four easy recipes – two quick, no-cook summer ideas and two year-round family favorites – that pair nutrient-dense tomato products with other nutritious staples. If sodium is a concern, use low- or reduced-sodium products. Each recipe has just three easy steps and costs only about $1.00 per serving.

 

Penny-pinching Gazpacho
Gazpacho is often called “liquid salad” because of all the vegetables in it.
This recipe substitutes canned, diced tomatoes for pricier fresh tomatoes. In
addition to being economical and a power-food, canned tomatoes are packed
with sun-ripened flavor because they’re picked at their peak.

Servings: 4 Cost per serving: $0.97* Total cost for family of four: $3.88*

Ingredients
1 14-oz. can of diced tomatoes
2 cups of tomato juice, low sodium
. medium cucumber, diced
. medium green pepper, diced
. cup medium onion, finely diced
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
Black pepper or hot sauce to taste
3-Step Prep
Combine all ingredients, mix thoroughly.
2. Refrigerate, serve cold.
3. If desired, top with croutons.

Nutrition Analysis Per Serving (approx. 1 cup)*
Calories 132
Calories from Fat 60
% DV◊
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0g 0%
Sodium 146mg 10%
Potassium 811mg 23%
Total carbohydrates 16g 5%
Dietary fiber 4g 16%
Sugars 9g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A 15%
Vitamin C 102%
Calcium 4%
Iron 9%
* Numbers may vary, depending on specific brands selected
◊ Percent Daily Value, based on 2,000-calorie-per-day diet
 

“Shirley Temple” Sangrita
Sangrita is a tangy tomato juice-based beverage traditionally served in Mexico
as a chaser to tequila. But it’s just as great enjoyed as a refreshing drink all
by itself. The combination of juices may seem unusual, but it’s what gives
the recipe its addictively delicious flavor and personality.

Servings: 4 Cost per serving: $0.47* Total cost for family of four: $1.88*

Ingredients
. cup of tomato juice, low sodium
. cup of orange juice
1 tablespoon of lemon or lime juice
Dash of onion powder
Black pepper or hot sauce to taste
3-Step Prep
Combine all ingredients
Serve chilled in tall glass.
3. Garnish with a fresh lemon or lime slice.

Nutrition Analysis Per Serving (approx. 1 cup)*
Calories 92
Calories from Fat 0
% DV◊
Total Fat 0g 0%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0g 0%
Sodium 70mg 3%
Potassium 685mg 19%
Total carbohydrates 27g 9%
Dietary fiber 2g 8%
Sugars 19g
Protein 2g
Vitamin A 5%
Vitamin C 156%
Calcium 2%
Iron 1%
* Numbers may vary, depending on specific brands selected
◊ Percent Daily Value, based on 2,000-calorie-per-day diet
 

Recession-proof Spaghetti
What could be faster than adding jarred spaghetti sauce to cooked pasta?
With this recipe, cook baby carrots with your pasta and you end up with an
even tastier (natural sweetness from the carrots) and more nutritious dish.
With this recipe, each person gets one full cup (or 2 servings) of vegetables.

Servings: 4 Cost per serving: $1.23* Total cost for family of four: $4.92*

Ingredients
1 (13-oz) box of whole grain pasta
2 cups of baby carrots, chopped
2 cups of jarred spaghetti sauce+
3-Step Prep
Cook spaghetti according to package instructions, adding carrots and pasta
together to boiling water.
Heat spaghetti sauce.
Drain pasta and carrots, combine with sauce and serve.

Nutrition Analysis Per Serving (approx. 1 cup)*+
Calories 477
Calories from Fat 51
% DV◊
Total Fat 6g 9%
Saturated Fat 0.5g 3%
Trans Fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0g 0%
Sodium 456mg 19%
Potassium 380mg 11%
Total carbohydrates 93g 32%
Dietary fiber 14g 63%
Sugars 18g
Protein 15g
Vitamin A 190%
Vitamin C 11%
Calcium 7%
Iron 20%
Phosphorous 26%
Magnesium 26%
Note: If you want to include meat in the sauce, adding 8 oz. of sauteed 94% lean ground beef means:
Total cost per serving increases to $1.92
Total cost for a family of four increases to $7.68
Total calories increase to 567; calories from fat increase to 111
Total fat increases to 11g or 16% DV
Saturated fat increases to 2.5g or 12% DV
Cholesterol increases to 33g or 11% DV
Sodium increases to 491mg or 21% DV
Protein increases to 27g
Iron increases to 28% DV
* Numbers may vary, depending on specific brands selected
+ This recipe uses spaghetti sauce with 25% less sodium
◊ Percent Daily Value, based on 2,000-calorie-per-day diet


Cost-conscious Chili Con Carne
Using turkey instead of beef cuts the saturated fat while still giving you a
great, meaty taste. Also, there’s very little water added, giving you a thick,
rich chili – add more water if you prefer yours a little soupier. This recipe
makes enough for two meals… Consider serving it over brown rice or whole
grain pasta the second time.

Servings: 8 Cost per serving: $0.95* Cost for a family of four: $7.60* (makes 2 meals)


Ingredients
1. lbs. 93% lean ground turkey
40. oz. can of kidney beans (1 large can)
18 oz. can of tomato paste
1 chopped onion
2 tsp chili powder
. cup water
3-Step Prep
Brown turkey in pot over medium heat until meat is no longer pink.
Stir in remaining ingredients and bring to a boil.
Reduce heat, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 20 minutes,
then serve.

Nutrition Analysis Per Serving (approx 1 cup)*
Calories 308
Calories from fat 32
% DV◊
Total fat 6g 9%
Saturated fat 2g 8%
Trans fat 0g 0%
Cholesterol 75g 26%
Sodium 603mg 27%
Total carbohydrates 36g 12%
Dietary fiber 23g 45%
Sugars 9g
Protein 29g
Vitamin A 11%
Vitamin C 14%
Calcium10%
Iron 14%
* May vary, depending on specific brands selected
◊ Percent Daily Value, based on 2,000-calorie-per-day diet